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BLOOD TEST TO DETECT HEART ATTACKS
Agencia Latina de Noticias de Medicina y Salud Pública, July 16, 2018.

Heart attacks can be diagnosed more quickly, thanks to the high-sensitivity blood test of troponin. Troponin, a protein that is released when a heart muscle is damaged, has been used in Europe since 2010, but it was not until last year that it was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Continue Reading>>

ATRIAL FIBRILLATION OUTPATIENT PATHWAYS
ACEP Frontline, February 26, 2018.

ACEP Frontline’s host Dr. Ryan Stanton is talks to Dr. Chris Baugh about his work on an atrial fibrillation panel and the tools they are working on to help you manage these patients. Continue Reading>>

HOW WE GOT HERE WITH THE 2 MIDNIGHT RULE
POBScast, June 1, 2017.

In this episode we retrace some of the pivotal moments from the inception of the 2 Midnight rule. Dr. Wheatley and I consult experts throughout the field of obs and get their take on whether it helped or hindered their practices. This week on the show we have Dr. Chris Baugh, Dr. Willie Smith, and Dr. Michael Ross joining us. You won’t hear a more comprehensive podcast on the policy and practice of the 2 midnight rule anywhere else. Continue Reading>>

OBSERVATION MEDICINE ACEP‘16
ACEP Frontline, December 27, 2016.

Host Ryan Stanton, MD, FACEP talks to Christopher Baugh, MD, FACEP and Anwar Osborne, MD, FACEP on the growth and importance of observation medicine in emergency medicine. Continue Reading>>

OBSERVATION MEDICINE IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
Urgent Matters, December 8, 2016.

Dr. Baugh currently serves as the Chair of the American College of Emergency Physicians Observation Medicine Section and Director of Emergency Department Operations at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He is also an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. Continue Reading>>

DEDICATED HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS COULD SAVE $3.1 BILLION
POBScast, November 28, 2015.

POBScast from Boston with Dr. Chris Baugh from Harvard Medical School. Continue Reading>>

TRANSLATING ‘TWO MIDNIGHTS’
ACP Hospitalist, December 1, 2013.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) probably had good intentions in redefining the difference between inpatient and observation, but the rule that went into effect on Oct. 1 may not have the intended results, according to experts. Continue Reading>>

AS CMS MAKES ANOTHER POLICY CHANGE, POLICY MAKERS DISTINGUISH BETWEEN DIFFERENT FORMS OF CARE
Relias Media, October 1, 2013.

As observation care continues to draw fire from critics who charge that the designation ends up costing hospitals money while also sticking patients with exorbitant fees, the medical directors of dedicated observation units counter that the kind of care delivered by their specialized units actually saves money and gets patients out of the hospital sooner. Continue Reading>>

DEDICATED HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS TO THE RESCUE
Physician’s Weekly, July 22, 2013.

Along with growing demand, rising costs and lower payments have threatened the financial viability of many hospitals, resulting in ED and hospital closures and a mismatch of supply and demand for acute care services. Considering these recent trends, efforts to improve healthcare efficiency are shifting focus toward enhancing hospital efficiency. Continue Reading>>

OBSERVATION UNITS CAN IMPROVE CARE BUT MAY BE COSTLY FOR PATIENTS
Kaiser Health News, February 12, 2013.

There’s a growing recognition by clinicians that some patients who arrive at the emergency department can benefit if they’re kept under observation for up to a day so that staff can run more tests and monitor their progress to see if their condition is improving or deteriorating. Continue Reading>>

HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS FILL GAPS, BUT PATIENTS MAY FOOT THE BILL
NPR. February 12, 2013.

If you find yourself in the emergency department and the doctor says he wants to keep you at the hospital for “observation,” take heed. Depending on the hospital, observation can mean very different things for both your medical care and your wallet. Continue Reading>>

OBSERVATION UNITS MAY EASE BURDENS OF ER CARE, BUT BENEFITS TO PATIENTS COME AT A PRICE
Washington Post, February 11, 2013.

A growing number of hospitals are opting to move some people from the emergency room into observation units where they can undergo further monitoring or testing before doctors decide whether they should be released or admitted. More than a third of hospitals report having such units today, a number that has doubled since 2003. Continue Reading>>

USING OBSERVATION UNITS, HOSPITALS COULD SAVE $3.1B
Healthcare Finance News, November 07, 2012.

Instead of admitting certain patients to the hospital, using dedicated observation units in hospitals can often be more efficient, result in shorter lengths-of-stay and lower costs, according to a recent study from Health Affairs. “The wider use of observation units may create cost savings and should be a model for acute care redesign to increase value in the U.S. healthcare system,” said the study’s lead author, Christopher Baugh, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Continue Reading>>

OBSERVATION UNITS SAVE MONEY
New England Journal of Medicine Journal Watch, October 19, 2012.

A mathematical model suggests that having an observation unit in every appropriate U.S. hospital could save $3.1 billion per year.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is reimbursing hospitals for “observation status” in lieu of hospital admission for patient observation, treatment, or diagnostic evaluation that is expected to require less than 24 hours. Patients with this status can be in regular emergency department (ED) beds, in dedicated observation units, or on traditional hospital wards with full-admission patients. A recent survey found that two thirds of U.S. hospitals did not have dedicated observation units. Continue Reading>>

WBUR ON-AIR INTERVIEW: MAKING GREATER USE OF DEDICATED HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS FOR MANY SHORT-STAY PATIENTS COULD SAVE $3.1 BILLION A YEAR
WBUR. October, 2012.

Using observation units in hospitals to provide care to certain patients can be more efficient than admitting them to the hospital and can result in shorter lengths-of-stay and lower costs. However, such units are present in only about one-third of US hospitals. We estimated national cost savings that would result from increasing the prevalence and use of observation units for patients whose stay there would be shorter than twenty-four hours. Continue Reading>>

DEDICATED HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS COULD SAVE $3.1 BILLION
Medscape News September 28, 2012.
HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS COULD SAVE THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEM $3.1 BILLION
Science Daily, September 28, 2012.

Researchers estimate that maximizing the potential of an observation unit in a hospital could result in $4.6 million in savings annually for the hospital and $3.1 billion in overall savings for the health care system in the United States. Continue Reading>>

HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS COULD SAVE BILLIONS IN HEALTH COSTS, STUDY SAYS
HealthDay News, September 27, 2012.

Wider use of hospital observation units could save the U.S. health care system billions of dollars a year, a new study indicates.

An observation unit is a space near or within the emergency department that provides an alternative to inpatient admission. The unit cares for patients, usually for a 24-hour period, who have been discharged from the emergency department but need further observation and aren’t ready to safely leave the hospital. Continue Reading>>

WIDER USE OF HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS COULD SAVE THE U.S. HEALTHCARE SYSTEM BILLIONS OF DOLLARS A YEAR, A NEW STUDY INDICATES
MedicineNet.com, September 26, 2012.

An observation unit is a space near or within the emergency department that provides an alternative to inpatient admission. The unit cares for patients, usually for a 24-hour period, who have been discharged from the emergency department but need further observation and aren’t ready to safely leave the hospital. Continue Reading>>

HOSPITAL OBSERVATION UNITS COULD SAVE $3.1 BILLION IN US HEALTH COSTS
Harvard Medical School News, September 2, 2012.

“We believe that this is the first attempt to quantify the financial impact of an observation unit,” said HMS instructor in medicine Christopher Baugh, lead researcher on the paper and a physician in the emergency department at Brigham and Women’s. “Wider use of observation units may play a significant role in saving cost for the health care system, and future policies that are focused on doing so should include support for observation units as an alternative to short-stay inpatient admission,” Baugh said. Continue Reading>>

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